Kassaga is CEO and co-founder of Teach For Uganda which recruits, trains and develops Uganda’s recent promising university graduates and young professionals to build a movement of solution-driven leaders working to end educational inequity.  Kassaga believes that Uganda’s social stability and future economic prospects depend on the quality of education we bequeath to the current and future generations. 

Prior to TFU, Kassaga had 8 years of international development experience working as a Health Fellow for the President Jimmy Carter Center, in Atlanta, Georgia, a 2012-13 Global Health Corps Fellow in New York, and  a School Partnerships Manager at Educate! Uganda.  In 2014, Kassaga was selected as an Acumen Global Fellow and spent a year in India working with a social enterprise providing education and livelihood skills to over 2 million underserved youth.

Kassaga is an Aspen Institute New Voices Fellow and his opinion pieces (Op-Eds) on ethical and effective development interventions have been featured in Al JazeeraNPR, Devex, The Guardian, and New York Times.  He graduated with a master of public health and policy magna cum laude from Florida State University's College of Social Sciences and Public Policy, and a MA in sustainable development and international Policy from the SIT Graduate, in Washington, DC. Right now, Kassaga currently delivers leadership training for local government leaders through the International Law Institute-Africa Center for Legal Excellence (ILI-ACLE) and for the Young And Emerging Leaders Project under LeO Africa Institute (YELP)

Kassaga proudly receiving the Early Stage Education Innovation Award from the Varkey Foundation at the Global Education Skills Forum, March 2017 in Dubai, U.A.E.

Kassaga proudly receiving the Early Stage Education Innovation Award from the Varkey Foundation at the Global Education Skills Forum, March 2017 in Dubai, U.A.E.


Education is the great engine of personal development. It is through education that the daughter of a peasant can become a doctor, that the son of a mine worker can become the head of the mine, that a child of farm workers can become the president of a great nation. It is what we make out of what we have, not what we are given, that separates one person from another.
— Nelson Mandela